Review: Dog Days, John Levitt

Book blurb
First in a new urban fantasy series-with a bite as magical as its bark.

Mason used to be an enforcer, ensuring that suspect magic practitioners stayed in line. But now he scrapes out a living playing guitar. Good thing he has Louie, his magical…well, let’s call him a dog. But there are some kinds of evil that even Louie can’t sniff out. And when Mason is attacked by a supernatural assailant, he’ll have to fall back on the one skill he’s mastered in music and magic-improvisation.

Review
I am a cat person. I just want to say that at the outset. I don’t hate dogs or anything, just not as fond of them as I am of cats. Having said that, I love Louie.

Louie may look like a miniature Doberman Pinscher but he is actually an ifrit and packs a mystical wallop, and is very helpful in guiding his owner/slave/companion Mason through the supernatural mess he finds himself in.

I also totally ‘get’ Mason. He is a man who has embraced that which gives him joy: playing jazz guitar, something he does a great deal of skill. He does have his shortcomings though: playing jazz guitar doesn’t bring in many bucks, and Mason is also someone who gets bored easily, only able to hack regular gigs for a while. Therefore money is tight, but he accepts that because he wants to live life the way he wants.

Oh and he also has magic. Once again, he uses it in his own way: recognizing that he isn’t the strongest user, but he is good at improvising – something he learnt from his music – and able to put that knowledge to good use when he finds himself in a jam. He is also very ethical in his use of magic, though he has a fairly laissez-faire attitude towards other magic-users.

Mason is happily minding his own business when he is attacked magically. His search to find out why leads him back to a life he’d left behind, a group of enforcers; people who ensured that magic practitioners stayed in line and, of course, the woman he’d once loved. His search for the truth behind the attack, the disappearance of magic practitioners and ifrits and the emergence of strange and mystically powerful jewels all come together in a compelling urban fantasy tale.

One thing I particularly enjoy is the way John Levitt paints a picture of a San Francisco, and its denizens, that is so close to reality. The people who have magic powers don’t seem all that different from the people you’d normally bump into: a buttoned-up but openly gay corporate type, a couple of leftover hippies, the driven and ambitious women, back-to-nature sports type, and various street people. People we would all recognize but who, in Levitt’s world, have that extra ‘umph’. Despite this, Levitt doesn’t stereotype any of them. They are archetypes we recognize but ones that don’t necessarily do what we would expect of them. Very refreshing.

This is a series that I would highly recommend to fans of the genre. If you like urban fantasy, this is one of the best examples of it.

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