Review, The Better Part of Darkness, Kelly Gay


Book Blurb:
Atlanta: it’s the promised city for the off-worlders, foreigners from the alternate dimensions of heaven-like Elysia and hell-like Charbydon. Some bring good works and miracles. And some bring unimaginable evil….

Charlie Madigan is a divorced mother of one, and a kick-ass cop trained to take down the toughest human and off-world criminals. She’s recently returned from the dead after a brutal attack, an unexplained revival that has left her plagued by ruthless nightmares and random outbursts of strength that make doing her job for Atlanta P.D.’s Integration Task Force even harder. Since the Revelation, the criminal element in Underground Atlanta has grown, leaving Charlie and her partner Hank to keep the chaos to a dull roar. But now an insidious new danger is descending on her city with terrifying speed, threatening innocent lives: a deadly, off-world narcotic known as ash. Charlie is determined to uncover the source of ash before it targets another victim — but can she protect those she loves from a force more powerful than heaven and hell combined?

Review
Charlie Madigan is a police officer in an Atlanta that is working hard to integrate the radically different off-worlders who are starting to make Earth their home. She’s tough, has a great partner and a supportive police Chief, but a little overworked as she struggles to balance a recent return from death, unruly off-worlders, being a single mom, and an ex who desparately wants back into her life. It is a precarious juggling act, one made harder by someone determined to stop her from solving her current investigation into an off-world drug. Someone who is more than willing to threaten her family, friends, partner and Charlie herself.

Kelly Gay has created a creative and detailed world full of diverse characters. I found her portrayal of Charlie’s rich family life both realistic and also something you don’t see often in urban fantasy, particularly a situation where the heroine is not only a mother but also the principal caregiver – in addition to being able to kick serious paranormal ass. The story moves at a brisk and exciting pace and Charlie’s challenging life leaves readers gasping for breath but definitely wanting more.

I am eagerly looking forward to the next in the Charlie Madigan series.

Find out more about Kelly Gay at her site or by following her on Twitter.

Rating
ratingratingratingratingrating

Review, Hunting Ground, Patricia Briggs

Review
The werewolves are coming.

Bran, leader (Marrok) of the North American werewolves has decided that, much like the Fae had done several years before, it was time for werewolves to announce their existence to the world. To ensure that this goes smoothly he arranges for an international conference with the werewolf leaders from around the world to discuss how it should be done and sends his son and pack enforcer, Charles, and Charles’ mate, Omega werewolf Anna, as representatives at the summit.

While a conference may not sound all that interesting keep in mind we are talking about lychanthropes here and Briggs weaves an intricate tale of warring supernaturals with enough twists and subplots to keep the reader on the edge of their seats.

Here we are introduced to the leader of the British wolves, who is convinced he is Arthur reincarnated, as well as the mad French leader, the legendary Beast of Gévaudan, Jean Chastel. There is a neophyte Omega werewolf who is the source of conflict between the Italian and German delegates. Also a Fae, whose powers are shaded in secrecy, who will be acting as mediator for the conference. Did I mention that she and Charles has a romantic past? Roll all that together with a gang of vampires using werewolf magic and tactics to try and kidnap Anna and the couple really have their hands full.

In Briggs’ deft hands we also get to see how the couple are adjusting to their new mating. Charles with his violent background may not seem to be the best match for the traumatized Anna but with her he can show all the gentleness and caring that he has been forced to keep hidden. Anna experiences continued growth here as she slowly becomes more at ease with her relationship with Charles and gains more confidence in her intuition and ability to reason as well as her darker nature.

With vivid characters, intricate plotlines and beautiful writing this book is sure to please and can be read alone, though you would be better off reading the first book, Cry Wolf.

P.S. Look for the reappearance of Tom and Moira, first introduced in Briggs’ short story ‘Seeing Eye’ in Strange Brew

Rating
ratingratingratingratingrating

Review: Already Dead, Charlie Huston

Review
Vampires in NYC. Heck, vampires controlling NYC. Very gangland.

In Huston’s take on popular vampire myths, Manhattan has been divided up by the vampire clans and our hero, Joe Pitt, is a well-connected ‘rogue’ just trying to find his way in the world that really doesn’t like rogues.

Joe is also a PI, who is hired by Marilee Horde, a prominent New York socialite, to locate her runaway teenage daughter, Amanda, who may be slumming with homeless goth kids in the East Village. Meanwhile, a “carrier” is on the loose, infecting its victims with a bacterium that turns them into brain-eating zombies and the group of uptown corporate-type vamps, The Coalition, want Pitt to find and destroy the carrier. After all, an influx of zombies does kind of bring unwanted attention to the undead community.

And what a fucked-up world this is! This story will suck you in, turn your stomach, and yet leave you wanting more. I loved the diversity of the type of vampire groups: corporate uptown-ers; 60s radicals, motorcycle gang-ers, tai chi higher being-seeking vamps, gangstah vamps, etc. Huston takes the usual vampire conventions, mixes in social commentary and adds enough violence to keep the most bloodthirtsy horror fan happy.

Rating
ratingratingratingrating

Review: Staked, J. F. Lewis

Book blurb
UNREPENTANT UNIMPRESSED AND TOTALLY UNDEAD
Eric’s got issues. He has short-term and long-term memory problems; he can’t remember who he ate for dinner yesterday, much less how he became a vampire in the first place. His best friend, Roger, is souring on the strip club he and Eric own together. And his girlfriend, Tabitha, keeps pressuring him to turn her so she can join him in undeath. It’s almost enough to put a Vlad off his appetite. Almost.

Eric tries to solve one problem, only to create another: he turns Tabitha into a vampire, but finds that once he does, his desire for her fades — and her younger sister, Rachel, sure is cute. And when he kills a werewolf in self-defense, things really get out of hand. Now a pack of born-again lycanthropes is out for holy retribution, while Tabitha and Rachel have their own agendas — which may or may not include helping Eric stay in one piece.

All Eric wants to do is run his strip club, drink a little blood, and be left alone. Instead, he must survive car crashes, enchanted bullets, sunlight, sex magic, and werewolves on ice — not to mention his own nasty temper and forgetfulness.

Because being undead isn’t easy, but it sure beats the alternative.

Review
Void City isn’t like other American cities. For one, well it is inhabited by a whole lot of supernatural creatures. One in particular, Eric, is not having a good, well, un-life. He is a vampire who owns a strip club and just woke up in an alley with no memory of how he got there (getting embalmed before you rise from the dead can play havoc with the memory) and had to kill a werewolf in self-defense. And wouldn’t you know it; the werewolf was connected. No, not that way: he was connected to a bunch of old-time-religion holy rollers who aren’t too pleased with vamps in general and strip club owning ones in particular.

In situations like this it is good to turn to your friends. Unfortunately, they don’t seem to be very willing to help. His best friend and business partner is acting off and the woman who would have been his wife (if he hadn’t become a vampire) is getting on in years and cranky. Then there is his current girlfriend, Tabitha, who really, really wants him to turn her. When he gives in and does it instead of the happily ever after she’d expected, he loses interest in her, especially after he meets her younger sister.

These days, a vampire owning a strip club is cliché, but Lewis makes Eric a character well worth watching. He may have difficulty remembering things but he is still a young vamp and hasn’t lost his humanity. He runs his business with kindness, taking care of his girls – and donors – with respect and understanding. Sure he is crude, sarcastic and caustic, but he genuinely cares about the people around him and he works hard to try and protect them.

I found the world that Lewis build around Eric fascinating. Not only are the characters rich, the way he describes the vampire hierarchy is complex and original. Excellent work.

Rating
ratingratingratingrating

Win “Deader Still” by Anton Strout!

I posted a review for Anton Strout’s first book in this series, “Dead to Me” here, giving it 5 Dragons. I mentioned that the next in the series, “Deader Still” was coming out on Feb 24th… well it is out now!

And Bitten by Books is giving you an opportunity to win a copy of the book.

Stop over and follow all their rules for how you can win the book (there are lots of ways to get an entry (or more). And remember… if you win ’cause you say it here you have to share the book with me. J/K (or am I?)

Good luck!

Review: The Protector’s War, S.M. Stirling

Review
S.M. Stirling is one of the the best writers of alternate history fantasy out there. I also greatly enjoy Andre Norton and Rosemary Edghill’s Carolus Rex series, as is Eric Flint’s Ring of Fire series. I admit to some occasional confusion about what alternate history is versus what urban fantasy is (and don’t even get me started on paranormal romance). After all, urban fantasy does re-write history to some extent; making it include vampires, shapeshifters and zombies. I guess my definition is that if it is something that happens in the past (even if just 1998, as in this series case) that makes things spin off in a different tangent, well that is alternate history. If it is vampires, fairies and other supernatural beings doing stuff in modern, mostly-urban settings then it is urban fantasy. Just don’t ask me what happens in situations where in the past, vampires, fairies and other supernatural beings come out and make things spin off in a different tangent… that is just too confusing (though I’ll read those books, don’t get me wrong. Will just avoid classifying them).

Still, this trilogy is a great example of what a truly gifted writer can do: take the current world, change one thing and create a new world that is as believable as the one we currently live in (is this one real or is it just aliens playing marbles… you decide). Stirling provides us with descriptions of a land gone wild, complete with ruined cities and towns so convincingly crafted we can almost see them. He does dip into the usual writer’s foible of having the good guys be just so darn good, but his descriptions of land, man and beast are so authentic you can almost smell the woodsmoke and see all of those kilts flapping.

Despite its title, this is more of a set-up to the war between the Bearkillers/Mackenzies and the Portland Protective Association, than the actual war. It is like watching the chess pieces being moved about the board; setting up for the final moves. Sorry, I don’t play chess so will have to leave that analogy at that.

If you don’t have this trilogy (Dies the Fire, The Protector’s War and Meeting at Corvallis), I suggest you get them as soon as possible. They are intricately woven tales about how the world could be, and maybe even will be.

Rating
ratingratingratingrating

Review: Dead to Me, Anton Strout

Book blurb
Psychometry – the power to touch an object and divine information about its history-has meant a life of petty crime for Simon Canderous, but now he’s gone over to the good side. At New York’s underfunded and (mostly) secret Department of Extraordinary Affairs, he’s learning about red tape, office politics, and the basics of paranormal investigation. But it’s not the paperwork that has him breathless.

After Simon spills his coffee on (okay, through) the ghost of a beautiful woman – who doesn’t know she’s dead – he and his mentor plan to find her killers. But Simon’s not prepared for the nefarious plot that unfolds before him, involving politically correct cultists, a large wooden fish, a homicidal bookcase, and the forces of Darkness, which kind of have a crush on him.”

Review
What happens when Good and Evil meet at the junction of bureaucracy?

Simon Canderous has spent years using his special gift of psychometry for nefarious purposes, but he is working for Good now, in the form of New York City’s Department of Extraordinary Affairs. Author Anton Strout’s description of life in the bureaucratic hell that is a government agency is spot on – even if the agency’s role is to protect the Good. Mountains of paperwork, fascinating but bizarre characters and the occasional zombie cleanup definitely make Simon’s determination not to fall back into a life of crime interesting.

While still trying hard to learn the job under the tutelage of his mentor Connor, Simon manages to find himself mixed up with a very confused ghost, evil cultists, a wooden fish, and a bunch of FOGies.

Much like the forces of Darkness, I too have a bit of a crush on Simon. Or maybe it is on Anton Strout for creating him. I love this world he has created and I am going to be eagerly waiting for the door to the bookstores to open on February 24th when the second Simon Canderous story, Deader Still, comes out.

Rating
ratingratingratingratingrating