Review: New Tricks, John Levitt

Book blurb
Mason used to be an enforcer, ensuring that suspect magic practitioners stayed in line. But he gave all that up for a quiet life scraping out a living playing guitar, keeping a low profile with Louie, his magical… well, let’s call him a dog. Luckily, Louie has a sixth sense for danger, and Mason knows exactly how dead he’d be without him.

It’s Halloween in the Castro district of San Francisco, which means that for once Mason doesn’t have to worry about the fact that vampires and ghosts are stalking the streets. What he does have to worry about is how his old flame Sarah became the victim of an attempted possession – leaving her an empty shell.

Mason’s only clue is the green rune stone found is her hand…

Review
Mason is not having a bad year. He’s got no girlfriend, no money, no upcoming gigs; he’s even gone back to working as a practitioner just to make ends meet. He’s in a major funk, and even partying on Castro Street isn’t helping.

When he is called on to help find a fellow practitioner who has gone missing, Mason finds himself with a new mystery to solve: what – or who – had left one of his old flame’s an empty shell.

Poor Mason. He really doesn’t have much luck with his old girlfriends does he? And things don’t necessarily get better in New Tricks.

Mason is joined in this tale by the some of the same characters found in the first book – including the required Louie – as well as some new ones who prove intriguing, though I admit I did figure out whodunit early.

Still, as in the first book, the plot is very enjoyable. We are given an opportunity to learn more about the possible genesis of ifrits, including a theory which, when acted upon, results in the creation of a horrible and deadly situation. It also begs the other questions: how far should practitioners go to help themselves rather than others, and does the end justify the means?

After reading this book I am even more invested in this series, and eagerly looking forward to more tales about Mason and Louie.

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Review: Blood Lite, editor: Kevin Anderson

Book blurb
The Horror Writers Association Presents BLOOD LITE
…a collection of entertaining tales that puts the fun back into dark fiction, with ironic twists and tongue-in-cheek wit to temper the jagged edge.

Charlaine Harris reveals the dark side of going green, when a quartet of die-hard environmentalists hosts a fundraiser with a gory twist in “An Evening with Al Gore”…In an all-new Dresden Files story from Jim Butcher, when it comes to tracking deadly paranormal doings, there’s no such thing as a “Day Off” for the Chicago P.D.’s wizard detective, Harry Dresden…Sherrilyn Kenyon turns a cubicle-dwelling MBA with no life into a demon-fighting seraph with one hell of an afterlife in “Where Angels Fear to Tread”…Celebrity necromancer Jaime Vegas is headlining a sold-out séance tour, but behind the scenes, a disgruntled ghost has a bone to pick, in Kelley Armstrong’s “The Ungrateful Dead.” Plus tales guaranteed to get under your skin — in a good way — from Janet Berliner, Don D’Ammassa, Nancy Holder, Nancy Kilpatrick, J. A. Konrath and F. Paul Wilson, Joe R. Lansdale, Will Ludwigsen, Sharyn McCrumb, Mark Onspaugh, Mike Resnick, Steven Savile, D. L. Snell, Eric James Stone, Jeff Strand, Lucien Soulban, Matt Venne, Christopher Welch.

So let the blood flow and laughter reign — because when it comes to facing our deepest, darkest fears, a little humor goes a long way!

Review
I admit that I prefer to read a full novel to reading short stories, but sometime life is so busy that too many interruptions can cause you to lose the thread of the story you’re trying to follow. When I know things are going to be busy, and because I go through massive withdrawal if I am not reading something, I like to pick up a book of novellas or a collection of short stories. I know I may not like all of them, but if I’ve chosen well most of the stories will help me keep me from going cold turkey even when life is getting me down.

And Blood Lite certainly fits the bill. Sure there were a few stories that didn’t give me the chuckle that the Horror Writers Association promised, but overall I left happy with the results.

It started out well. Kelley Armstrong’s Ungrateful Dead left me laughing out loud at our heroine’s solution to the situation she’d found herself in. After all, a ghost may think you work for them but that doesn’t mean they can take advantage. They don’t really have a leg (or a body) to stand on…

Matt Venne’s story about the tribulations of poor Elvis Presley had me feeling for the man as he suffered through the bloodsucker blues.

I loved how Charlaine Harris’ An Evening with Al Gore kept me guessing, and satisfied with its environmentally sound conclusion.

And who hasn’t wanted to write a letter like the ones Steven Saville gives us in Dear Prudence?

Sharyn McCrumb’s Dead Hand shows that sometimes getting the chance of a lifetime, even when you’re dead, holds many more catches than you want to deal with.

And I’ve had many days off that didn’t turn out like I wanted them too, but Jim Butcher’s Day Off… worse than any I’ve had.

All in all, this is a fun collection of tales that you can revisit again and again.

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Review: Dog Days, John Levitt

Book blurb
First in a new urban fantasy series-with a bite as magical as its bark.

Mason used to be an enforcer, ensuring that suspect magic practitioners stayed in line. But now he scrapes out a living playing guitar. Good thing he has Louie, his magical…well, let’s call him a dog. But there are some kinds of evil that even Louie can’t sniff out. And when Mason is attacked by a supernatural assailant, he’ll have to fall back on the one skill he’s mastered in music and magic-improvisation.

Review
I am a cat person. I just want to say that at the outset. I don’t hate dogs or anything, just not as fond of them as I am of cats. Having said that, I love Louie.

Louie may look like a miniature Doberman Pinscher but he is actually an ifrit and packs a mystical wallop, and is very helpful in guiding his owner/slave/companion Mason through the supernatural mess he finds himself in.

I also totally ‘get’ Mason. He is a man who has embraced that which gives him joy: playing jazz guitar, something he does a great deal of skill. He does have his shortcomings though: playing jazz guitar doesn’t bring in many bucks, and Mason is also someone who gets bored easily, only able to hack regular gigs for a while. Therefore money is tight, but he accepts that because he wants to live life the way he wants.

Oh and he also has magic. Once again, he uses it in his own way: recognizing that he isn’t the strongest user, but he is good at improvising – something he learnt from his music – and able to put that knowledge to good use when he finds himself in a jam. He is also very ethical in his use of magic, though he has a fairly laissez-faire attitude towards other magic-users.

Mason is happily minding his own business when he is attacked magically. His search to find out why leads him back to a life he’d left behind, a group of enforcers; people who ensured that magic practitioners stayed in line and, of course, the woman he’d once loved. His search for the truth behind the attack, the disappearance of magic practitioners and ifrits and the emergence of strange and mystically powerful jewels all come together in a compelling urban fantasy tale.

One thing I particularly enjoy is the way John Levitt paints a picture of a San Francisco, and its denizens, that is so close to reality. The people who have magic powers don’t seem all that different from the people you’d normally bump into: a buttoned-up but openly gay corporate type, a couple of leftover hippies, the driven and ambitious women, back-to-nature sports type, and various street people. People we would all recognize but who, in Levitt’s world, have that extra ‘umph’. Despite this, Levitt doesn’t stereotype any of them. They are archetypes we recognize but ones that don’t necessarily do what we would expect of them. Very refreshing.

This is a series that I would highly recommend to fans of the genre. If you like urban fantasy, this is one of the best examples of it.

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Review: One Foot in the Grave, Jeaniene Frost

Book blurb
You can run from the grave, but you can’t hide . . .

Half-vampire Cat Crawfield is now Special Agent Cat Crawfield, working for the government to rid the world of the rogue undead. She’s still using everything Bones, her sexy and dangerous ex, taught her, but when Cat is targeted for assassination, the only man who can help her is the vampire she left behind.

Being around him awakens all her emotions, from the adrenaline kick of slaying vamps side by side to the reckless passion that consumed them. But a price on her head—wanted: dead or half-alive—means her survival depends on teaming up with Bones. And no matter how hard she tries to keep things professional between them, she’ll find that desire lasts forever . . . and that Bones won’t let her get away again.

Review
I may never complain about my family again…

This is the second in the Night Huntress series, and once again we meet Cat Crawfield, who is no longer slaying rogue vampires on her own – she is doing it for the government.

Not a lot has changed in the five years has past since she ducked out on her vampire lover and tutor, Bones. Sure she now heads her team in her special FBI division, having several others working with her now, but she is still kicking ass, killing vamps and dealing with her mother and her mother’s obsession.

Now, however, there is someone out there trying to assassinate her. Bones to the rescue.

Okay, not the rescue because Frost’s Cat is more than capable of saving herself, but it doesn’t hurt to have a hunky vampire at your back. Or in your bed.

Following Cat as she juggles old boyfriends, assassination attempts, workplace romance, MAJOR family issues is a very fun ride. There is plenty of action both in and out of the bedroom. Definitely a series that will keep you on the edge of your seat, with a stake close to hand.

While I would suggest you pick up a copy of this book, I recommend that you start with the first book in the series, Halfway To The Grave. The third installment, At Grave’s End was just released (December 30) and once I’m finished reading it myself, I will post a review.

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